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Vapers Get Health Insurance Boost

Vapers Get Health Insurance Boost

VAPERS are to enjoy the same insurance rates as non-smokers for the first time, according to a UK report.

E-cigarette users will save thousands of pounds in health insurance after years of being put in the same category as smokers.

The change comes after a Public Health England report earlier this year showed vaping to be 95 per cent less harmful than cigarettes. Vape advocates immediately called for a subsequent change to insurance premiums to reflect vaping being a far healthier alternative to smoking.

Earlier this year, it was reported that life insurance had started to drop after experts revealed at an industry conference how insurance companies were downgrading the risk for users of e-cigarettes or nicotine-containing smoking substitutes.

It was revealed at the time, by independent insurance broker Future Proof, how until then, it had cost an average of £12,617 over 20 years for £100,000 of life cover for a non-smoker, while an e-cigarette user could expect to pay over double, with an estimate of £30,924.

The average 25-year charge for a 40-year-old with £100,000 cover, also rose from £2,838 to £5,877, if they vaped.

Vapers have now seen a further upgrade by being treated the same as non-smokers when looking for life insurance. A new comparison site for e-cigarette users, which has been working with vaping groups to bring about the move, will help them find the right life and critical illness insurance at a non-smoking price.

A spokeswoman from the UK Vaping Industry Association, who has been fighting for change on behalf of vapers, said of the latest developement: “This is fantastic news for vapers all across the UK who will finally be given fair treatment.

“It is a great sign to see that one of the most risk adverse industries is finally acknowledging the health evidence and is moving away from treating vapers as smokers.”

It comes following more good news for UK vape users after a proposed tax on e-cigarettes to raise an extra £40million for the country’s ailing National Health Service was quashed by government after a backlash.

According to government insiders, e-cigarettes had been added to the Treasury’s so-called list of “sin taxes”, which were set for increases in this Fall’s budget.